A Thousand Sunrises

4:24 AM

I've been traveling. I've been busy. I've been not writing.
You know, when your boyfriend's grandma mentions to you that you haven't posted in a while, maybe it's time to prioritize.
*Hi Grandma Rachel*
 
So, I've been traveling.
Early.
Which only has one perk: I see the sunrise on a consistant basis. I see it rise over Detroit, which is incredible. I see it rise over Ann Arbor, which is also incredible. Lapeer, Chelsea, Pinckney, Novi, the list goes on forever. It's all incredible.
 
What's fascinating to me is that the sun rises every single day. Without question. And it's fantastic no matter where you are. Can you imagine that every single person in the entire world gets to share the most wonderful thing in life? A neverending sunrise.
 
 
Common threads, like the sunrise, are magical. I've always believed that we are all far more similar than not, but now, more than ever, I think the common threads are sticking with me.
 
I spend my days in high schools where one's value is directly proportional to their appearance. Where young people strive to fit in, be the same, and bully the heck out of those who are different. Last time I was here, I was one of them. It's strange to enter a high school as an adult, because the view is so very different.
 
 
We're all the same. Basically. We all feel fear. We all need love. We all seek happiness.
 
A few days ago, I stood for a long time at a table in a high school cafeteria. The smell was the same as it was when I was in high school. The people were the same too. If I were Drew Barrymore, and this was Never Been Kissed, and I had to return to my former seventeen-year-old life, I could easily slip in and figure out who was who. The popular girls, they still look like they did ten years ago. The nerdy kids who will someday be everyone's boss, they look the same too. I could visually spot the football stars.
 
I guess somethings don't change.
 
 
Like the sunrise. It happens every day and its purpose is to educate.
High school is a learning experience. It builds character and prepares young people for their future. A future where it doesn't matter who is wearing Hollister and who is wearing Meijer brand. A future in which having the longest blonde hair and the skinniest thighs doesn't make you the most important person in the room.
 
I didn't know that stuff when I was in high school. I was like most students: hard on myself and hard on others. My judgement was harsh in both circumstances. But, you know, I learned. And now, being an adult in a high school, I'm learning some more. I can spot more effectively what I couldn't see before.
 

 
It's been a learning experience, this traveling thing.
 
I've learned that it's okay to stand out. Be the red in a yard full of orange and green.
In fact, sometimes there is nothing more beautiful than being the stand-out.
 

 
I've learned that there's no place like home.
 
 
I've learned that it's good to reflect.
 
 
I've learned that the sun goes down.
 

 
But only so it can start all over the next day.
 
 
****
 
It's a good life.
 
 


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